Cardiovascular disease after preeclampsia

​Women with a history of preeclampsia are invited to cardiac CT-scan to detect coronary atherosclerotic changes. 

A research project by Doctor, PhD-student  Maria Guldbrandt Hauge

Women with previous preeclampsia have increased risk of coronary artery disease. 1000 women with a history of preeclampsia between 35-55 years of age are invited to cardiac CT -scan to identify coronary atherosclerotic changes in order to identify a window of opportunity where screening and preventive measures may be relevant and potentially beneficial.

Women with a history of preeclampsia (PE) have increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life. Despite this, solid and uniform guidelines regarding follow-up after a pregnancy complicated by PE are lacking. Little is known about the time-course of the development of CVD and how early stages can be identified in women with previous PE.

The purpose of this study is to investigate 1) the prevalence of CVD after PE, 2) which women have the highest risk of developing CVD, 3) when early stages of CVD can be detected in women with previous PE and 4) how CVD progress over time. Thus, we hope to identify a window of opportunity where screening and preventive measures may be relevant and potentially beneficial to these women.
1000 women with previous PE (aged 35-55 years) are invited to participate in a clinical follow-up study with cardiac CT-scan. Age-matched women, with a formerly uncomplicated pregnancy, who have all participated in a large population study, will comprise a control group.

The link between PE and CVD is well established. However, no large clinical study using cardiac CT-scans exists. Moreover, the study will focus on the time-perspective of the development of CVD in relation to index pregnancy, and this knowledge may prove to be essential to establish solid clinical guidelines addressing timely prevention and treatment. This study can add new important information leading to improved follow-up, and potentially prevent disease and early death in a large group of women with a history of PE.  







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