Research overview and current projects

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Research areas in the Department of Paediatric Surgery:
  • Attempt to find optimal treatment strategies for boys whose testicles are undescended.
  • Motility study of the oesophagus in connection with reflux or after treatment of congenital atresia.
  • Urodynamic studies of congenital abnormalities in the urinary tract.
  • In vitro survival of germ cells and testicular hormone production after freezing.
  • Prognostic significance of neonatal urodynamics in connection with urinary tract abnormalities.
  • Controlled testing of new drugs.

Paediatric surgery is not an independent specialist area, but a discipline under surgery. The area covers diagnostic evaluation, treatment and check up of children with congenital and acquired diseases. Diseases include injuries in the oesophagus, the digestive tract, liver, the biliary tract, pancreas, urinary tract and genital organs, where surgery can be an important step of the treatment. Research in the department concentrates on the specialist fields.

For more information about the research areas see the publications of the department or contact one of the researchers in the department.

Current projects

  • Studying the correlation between testes histopathology and hormone analyses in connection with cryptorchidism.
  • Evaluating the physiological conditions in oesophagus after different anti-reflux procedures.
  • Nordic multi-centre study of operative versus non-operative treatment of diagnosed prenatal hydronephrosis.
  • In vitro survival of germ cells and testicular hormone production after freezing.
  • Prognostic significance of neonatal urodynamics in connection with urinary tract abnormalities.
  • Attempt to find optimal treatment strategies for boys whose testicles are undescended.
  • Motility study of the oesophagus in connection with reflux or after treatment of congenital atresia.
  • Urodynamic studies of congenital abnormalities in the urinary tract.
  • Controlled testing of new drugs.
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